Site Map and Navigation Page

 

This page exists to make it easy to find any page on "WorkEnergyTheorem.com".   It also lists the purpose and or overview of the individual pages so a visitor can quickly find what is wanted; one click to get here and another to get the desired information.  Every page has two links to this one; one at the top right and another at the bottom left.

 

Recommended Sequence

  1. Welcome Page This is the page you come to when you first come to "WorkEnergyTheorem.com".  It demonstrates a fundamental flaw in the Law of Conservation of Momentum.

  2. History  This page lists the actual history of momentum and kinetic energy taken from numerous sources (Books and Internet).  It can and should be verified if visitors have any doubts as to its authenticity.

  3. The Errors of the Past  Here the errors made by the scientists of the past are revealed.

  4. Ironic Experiment  This page provides a provisional hypothesis and analyzes the only experiment done prior to the general acceptance of the Work Energy Theorem.

 

Supplemental Pages  These have links to them in the above pages and are conveniently listed here.

 

Academic Experiment  Here, the impressive experiment often done while teaching the Work Energy Theorem is examined and its flawed premise is exposed for all to see.

Explosion Scenario  Shows why momentum cannot be used to quantify mechanical energy.

Scientific Method  Contains a brief discussion of the Scientific Method and its relationship to the acceptance of the Work Energy Theorem.

Deriving the Work Energy Theorem  Shows a simple method of deriving the simplest versions of the impulse / momentum equation and the Work Energy Theorem.

 

 Suggestions, corrections, and comments are welcome.  Please email me at SurprisedOwl@gmail.com

 

The easy thing to do is to assume conventional wisdom is correct since everyone else agrees.  No one improved a science because they went along with the crowd.  The real heroes in science are those who recognize that a revolutionary idea is correct.  Yes, Galileo, Copernicus, and Kepler are well known; they changed the world but, their contributions would be meaningless if the unsung heroes of the past did not run with their work.  It is the unsung hero who does as much or more by recognizing the truth when he sees it.  I don't want any fame (my name is nowhere to be found on this website); I want the physics community to play by their own rules and get it right; that is what they get paid to do.